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Law Student Podcast: On the road at Annual Meeting

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Law Student Podcast
Sandy Gallant-Jones (from left to right) and Kareem Aref interview outgoing ABA President Paulette Brown during a taping of the Law Student Podcast at the 2016 ABA Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

The new hosts of the Law Student Podcast dove right in to their jobs behind the microphone during the ABA Annual Meeting in San Francisco as part of Legal Talk Network’s On the Road series.

Sandy Gallant-Jones and Chris Morgan, the 7th Circuit Governor and 12th Circuit Governor in the Law Student Division, will be the full-time hosts of the podcast this year. Incoming Division Chair Kareem Aref took a solo flight on one session while also co-hosting on another, and Lynae Tucker, student editor of Student Lawyer magazine, also had a turn in the second chair.

Check them all out:

Outgoing President Paulette Brown’s Year in Review

The life of an American Bar Association President is very busy. This is particularly true for one who travels to all 50 states, is dedicated to the well-being of young people, and leads by example. Sandy and Kareem sat down with outgoing ABA President Paulette Brown.

Together, they discuss her programs for diversity and inclusion, her work with the Boys and Girls Club of America, and special moments that meant a great deal. As the first woman of color to head the ABA, Paulette had much to say about the importance of being involved from the inside rather than merely looking in. She believes it’s crucial for both young lawyers and law students to be personally involved in helping the next generation. Being present and engaged shows young people what is possible and helps them aspire to more. In closing, President Brown implores busy law students to manage stress by getting plenty of exercise, making time for personal reflection, and even allowing for the occasional indulgence.

President Linda Klein’s Year To Come

Chris and Lynae are up on this one. They sat down with incoming ABA President Linda Klein, who is the 140th person to head the American Bar Association.

They discuss Linda’s early pro bono work for the elderly and her upcoming programs designed help our nation’s veterans. In addition, Linda tells us about her decades long involvement with the American Bar Association and how forging early relationships helped guide her career. She encourages lawyers to volunteer and citizens to vote. In addition, she believes that lawyers need to play a part to ensure the next generation receives a good primary education.

Law School and Writing Legal Dramas for Television

Sandy speaks with former federal prosecutor, producer, and author Jonathan Shapiro about his work writing legal dramas for television. Jonathan gives a brief synopsis of his legal background as a federal prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney’s Office and talks about the path that led him to become of counsel at the law firm of O’Melveny & Myers. He reminisces about his early career, meeting his wife, Betsy Borns, and selling his first script to writer and producer David E. Kelley.

The work of writers, he says, is to use their experience to create new material, and he discusses how this relates to his new book, “Deadly Force,” and his current show, “Goliath.” Jonathan closes the interview with an analysis of the high numbers of alcohol abuse among attorneys and his suggestions on how law schools can better teach students to form cogent persuasive arguments and revitalize the nobility and idealism of the legal profession.

Korematsu v. United States

Kareem speaks with founder and executive director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute Karen Korematsu about her father’s landmark case, Korematsu v. United States.

Karen explains that the case challenged the military orders and the constitutionality of the Japanese American incarceration during World War II and that In 1983 evidence was found that proved there was no military necessity for the internment. She recalls growing up in Oakland, California, being blamed for the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the bullying and discrimination she and her brother suffered because they were Asian American. It was not until she studied U.S. history as a junior in high school that she was made aware of the Korematsu v. United States case and her father’s 1944 Supreme Court hearing.

Karen compares the societal attitude of her youth to the political climate of today and discusses the recent evocation by a Virginia mayor of Roosevelt’s 1942 Executive Order 9066 during his call for area governments and nongovernmental agencies to suspend and delay any further assistance to Syrian refugees. She closes the interview with examples of how her organization fights bigotry through education and her thoughts on what we can do today to avoid the mistakes of the past.

ABA Law Student Division The Law Student Division empowers law student by providing them with meaningful connections to practicing professionals, job resources, relevant programming, and practical skills competitions. We represent the law student community by advocating for policies that improve legal education, champion diversity, and strengthen public service.