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Author: Quimbee

Quimbee Quimbee is one of the most widely used and respected study aids for law students. With a massive and growing library of case briefs, video lessons, practice exams, and multiple-choice questions, Quimbee helps its members achieve academic success in law school.

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Quimbee Champion v. Ames

Lottery appeal gamble doesn't stand a chance (Champion v. Ames)

September 21, 2018

The Federal Lottery Act of 1895 cited moral grounds to forbid anyone from shipping lottery tickets across state lines. The United States indicted Charles Champion for violating the act, and he sought a writ of habeas corpus to challenge the law.

Discretion with intent to discriminate in DC? (Washington v. Davis)

August 17, 2018

Washington, D.C., administered a written exam to applicants to the police department. The test, though administered uniformly to all applicants, disqualified four times as many black candidates as white candidates. As a result, the police department was 80 percent white in a city that was 70 percent black.

Quimbee: Craig v. Boren

Women's near-beer tier takes the OK out of Oklahoma law (Craig v. Boren)

August 10, 2018

This is the latest in a series of Quimbee.com case brief videos. Have you signed up for your Quimbee membership? The American Bar Association offers three months of Quimbee study aids (a $72 value) for law student members. And if you go Premium, you’ll receive Quimbee Legal Ethics Outline (a

Quimbee: Plyler v. Doe

Undocumented students get Equal Protection in Texas case (Plyler v. Doe)

July 27, 2018

This is the latest in a series of Quimbee.com case brief videos. Have you signed up for your Quimbee membership? The American Bar Association offers three months of Quimbee study aids (a $72 value) for law student members. And if you go Premium, you’ll receive Quimbee Legal Ethics Outline (a

Quimbee: Brandenburg v. Ohio

Convicted Klansman gets reversal on 'revengeance' speech (Brandenburg v. Ohio)

July 20, 2018

Ku Klux Klansman Clarence Brandenburg was charged with violating an Ohio state law that made it a crime to advocate “crime, sabotage, violence, or unlawful methods of terrorism as a means of accomplishing industrial or political reform.” Brandenburg was convicted, and he appealed on the ground that the state law violated the First Amendment.

Quimbee: Gonzales v. Carhart

Partial-birth abortion ban struck down (Gonzales v. Carhart)

July 13, 2018

LeRoy Carhart and other doctors challenged the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003, arguing that the law was both void for vagueness and unduly burdensome on women’s right to abortions. In Gonzales v. Carhart, 550 U.S. 124 (2007), the United States Supreme Court considered the constitutionality of the federal act.

Missouri v. Holland

Justices get well-versed in bird law (Missouri v. Holland)

June 22, 2018

This is the latest in a series of Quimbee.com case brief videos. Have you signed up for your Quimbee membership? The American Bar Association offers three months of Quimbee study aids (a $72 value) for law student members. And if you go Premium, you’ll receive Quimbee Legal Ethics Outline (a

Penn Central Transportation Co. v. New York City

Grand Central owner's takings argument sidetracked (Penn Central Transportation Co. v. New York City)

May 18, 2018

Local governments may act to protect sites with historical, cultural, or other significance by designating those places landmarks. In so doing, governments are able to preserve those properties for future generations, but landmark designations restrict the rights of property owners. The case of Penn Central Transportation Co. v. New York City, 438 U.S. 104 (1978), exemplifies this tension.

Goldwater v. Carter

Justices phrase their answer in the form of a question (Goldwater v. Carter)

April 20, 2018

In the 1970s, President Jimmy Carter hoped to establish a treaty with the People’s Republic of China. To facilitate that, President Carter unilaterally rescinded a defense treaty between the United States and Taiwan. A group of senators, including Senator Barry Goldwater, were incensed by the president’s action and filed suit.

Grutter v. Bollinger

Promoting diversity? It's Constitutional! (Grutter v. Bollinger)

April 06, 2018

Barbara Grutter was a successful business owner with excellent academic credentials. In 1997, Grutter applied to the University of Michigan Law School. Grutter was ultimately rejected from the program. Grutter, who was white, argued that the denial amounted to racial discrimination.

Quimbee City of Boerne v. Flores

Religious Freedom Restoration Act sins against the Fourteenth (City of Boerne v. Flore)

March 23, 2018

Congress passed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) to prohibit federal and state governments from passing laws that substantially burden a person’s free exercise of religion. The act was intended to affect any law that substantially burdened religious practice, including generally applicable laws not targeted at religious activity.